Jun 01

Tasty communication

Posted by Wallentin in Uncategorized

One day, I was asked by a Swedish Food Journal to give my views on how to best communicate taste on pack design. The title in Swedish was “Do you speak a food language?”

Before I start, I should like to say that I am one of the lucky few who, during my education and later, in my professional life, had to work both verbally (as a journalist) and visually (as a designer).

My advice will be divided in 4 categories:

  1. the visual language, i.e. appetite appeal
  2. the symbolic language
  3. the verbal language
  4. the layout and how to maximise food appeal on a pack

Appetite appeal

The Tesco orange box and the Swiss Kambly biscuit tin say it well: “a picture is worth a thousand words” which was coined as early as in 1911 in a US newspaper article about publicity.

Mon Chéri and the bag of bread are here to show that, in order to have taste, you must come closest possible to the product. Small food illustrations do not taste!

The symbolic language

It is very powerful to use a symbolic language. Can strength be better expressed than on the Tabasco ad? I doubt!

Kellogg’s Crunchy Nut and Nestlé’s CRUNCH show that there are several ways of expressing crunchiness.

The verbal language

McDonald’s is, in my opinion, the master and I could give many examples. I’ll select just one on their cartons for Big Macs.

Another way of telling a story are descriptive brands (Gusto Italiano, Utterly Butterly and Seriously strong).

If “chocolat” is good, “aux pépites de chocolat” is certainly more tasty!

Monoprix has an assortment where each pack says exactly what it is. I would say that, if you have a powerful communication, you do not even need a brand, as in the case of “sans arêtes” Sardines.

It is important to have the best words on the pack design. It is even more important on point-of-sale and in advetising.

Snickers’ “affamé” (hungry) says it all and so does Le Parfait bread spread “spread it quickly, but savour it slowly”.

Layout

Here is where most designers and brand managers get it wrong. Most of them believe that the logotype must be on top when in fact it is the product that should be there. The illustration will always stand out better if it is in the foreground, as on the Chinese fruit cake pack or in the case of McDonald’s BIG TASTY.

The product I prefer by far is the Swedish version of KitKat, i.e. Cloetta’s KEX which is not so crunchy, nor chocolatey, but I doubt a design can express the product and its taste in a better way. Now that’s my opinion and as the saying goes: “De gustibus non est disputandum” (there is no disputing about taste).

 

LW/May 2017

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